Trademark Guidelines

This page contains the official guidelines for use of the JBoss trademark and individual Project trademarks.

 

JBoss Trademark

 

The word JBoss derives from EJBoss which was the original name for the application server project. However as we weren't allowed to use the EJB acronym in the name the E was dropped leaving JBoss. Most people continue to use JBoss as a synonym for JBoss AS even though the name went on to represent the company JBoss Inc. and was used as a prefix for it's product names; JBoss AS, JBoss Cache, JBoss Rules, etc...

 

This is similar to how the Apache name originally represented the httpd project but then evolved to represent the 'Apache Software Foundation' and was used as a prefix for its project names: Apache Tomcat, Apache Ant, Apache ActiveMQ. Most people continue to use Apache as a synonym for Apache httpd.

 

Following the acquisition of JBoss Inc. by Red Hat the JBoss brand continued to be used for the product line. However instead of individual projects becoming products, as happened before, multiple projects were combined together to form products known as platforms:

 

  • JBoss Enterprise Application Platform
  • JBoss Enteprise Portal Platform
  • JBoss Enteprise SOA Platform

 

These products are collectively known as JBoss Enterprise Middleware and have the following logo:

 

JBrgbjpg.png

 

The 'by Red Hat' text indicates that the although the products are based upon open source projects they are tested, patched and maintained soley by Red Hat. For guidelines on using the JBoss trademark visit the Red Hat Trademark Guidelines and Policies page.

 

Legacy Product Names

 

In JBoss Inc. individual projects became products so project names were generic to reflect functionality and used JBoss as a prefix:

 

  • JBoss AS
  • JBoss Cache
  • JBoss Portal
  • JBoss ESB
  • JBoss Messaging

 

Following the acquisition these products were deprecated in favour of new products created from multiple projects. The new products adopted the naming scheme above so individual projects were no longer allowed to have generic names or use the JBoss prefix. Projects with legacy product names have since been renamed or replaced with new projects to avoid confusion:

 

  • JBoss Cache - replaced with Infinispan
  • JBoss Portal - replaced with GateIn
  • JBoss ESB - renamed to SwitchYard
  • JBoss Messaging - replaced with HornetQ

 

JBoss Community

 

The JBoss Community is a collection of projects led by Red Hat that are either part of a JBoss product or help in the creation of a JBoss product. This arrangement allows other people to contribute to the projects if necessary to take advantage of rapid innovations and bug fixes without having to wait for the projects to go through the 'productization' process and appear in a platform later on. The JBoss Community logo has a less corporate look and feel to indicate this separation of concerns:

 

jbosscommunity_logo_hori_white.png

JBoss Community projects are usually hosted at http://jboss.org but for projects hosted elsewhere which are part of a product, or help in the creation of a product, we have a 'Friends of the JBoss Community' logo that can be used to show association:

 

jbosscommunity-friend_badge-82x.png

 

Since both the 'JBoss Community' and 'Friends of the JBoss Community' logos contain the JBoss trademark the Red Hat Trademark Guidelines and Policies also apply if you wish to use them.

 

Community Websites

 

In the past, community members have inquired whether it is permissible to use the JBoss Trademark in an Internet domain name. The guidelines relating to such usage are set forth in this section.

 

As the JBoss trademark is owned by Red Hat worldwide and officially used for their middleware product line it's not possible for community members to use it in a domain name regardless of their country of origin or registrar. Instead we recommend that local communities form a JBoss User Group (JBUG) and use a *.jbug.org domain name supplied by the JBoss Community, along with their own hosting. This avoids direct association with the JBoss product brand and retains a relationship to the projects as they are often the subjects of discussion within JBoss User Group meetings.

 

Not every local community requires a local domain. Many local communities can function perfectly well using the http://community.jboss.org domain where we can create new pages for JBUGs if necessary, for example:

 

 

In addition, splitting off a domain has the tendency to keep local community members from getting up to date information that flows on the official JBoss Community channels. It multiplies the number of areas a community member needs to monitor and thus takes away from the time they could otherwise spend contributing directly to the projects.

 

However, there are some good reasons for local domains to exist, and we realize the importance of enabling JBUGs to grow in localities around the world. Therefore we have a few options available to people who want to set up a domain to support this effort.

Options

 

There are essentially two options open to local communities who want to purchase a domain with the word "jbug" in the name for purposes of JBoss Community work.

Pre-purchased domain

This option is preferable in most instances because of the benefits listed below.

 

Red Hat can provide a subdomain in the *.jbug.org domain, and arrange for it to point to the jboss.org domain name servers. Since we control those name servers, it is very easy for the Eng Ops team to then direct host queries to the appropriate community server(s).

 

BenefitsDrawbacks
  • Red Hat pays for registration and maintenance of the domain name.
  • Domain purchases or transfers initiated quickly and maintained by our provider.
  • Encourages a standard for domain names where practical.
  • Red Hat automatically renews domains regularly.
  • Easiest way to preserve trademark coherence around the world since Red Hat technically owns the domain.
  • Community does not own the domain name itself, although it controls the domain content.

 

Reserved Names

  • <two-letter-code>.jbug.org subdomains are reserved for official ISO-3166 country codes. Longer subdomains can be used for other purposes.

 

To use this option:

 

If you are to be responsible for the hosts for the community site, ensure your jboss.org account is up to date. If someone else is to be responsible, make sure you have their name and complete contact information available.

 

  • Contact us with your request. Use the subject Community domain request. Indicate whether you or someone else is to be responsible for the hosts. Do not send any other personal information but please indicate the following:
    • Names of the team that will maintain the site, and their current roles in the JBoss Community
    • Services that will be offered through the new domain
    • An IP address or URL where we can look at the content and presentation, and verify that the trademark guidelines are being consistently applied
  • After review, you will be assigned an appropriate subdomain and contacted for required host information. The Eng Ops team will ask for IP addresses, and will assign A, AAAA, and TXT records as needed.

 

Note that we cannot guarantee availability of a domain other than *.jbug.org, nor that we will provide more than one domain for a particular community group. Currently we do not plan to issue records other than those listed in the process above (e.g. MX for mail servers).The purpose of additional local community domains is to allow domains to set up web sites and forums in a locale's language, but to keep that community cohesive with the rest of the JBoss Community.

Self-purchased domain

Communities may purchase their own domains, but only after completing a trademark license agreement from Red Hat, pursuant to the trademark guidelines.

 

BenefitsDrawbacks
  • Community owns the domain name as well as the content.
  • Individual community leader must go through required paperwork for a trademark license agreement, and be legally responsible for the domain.
  • Delay of a few days to a few weeks, depending on locale.
  • Community leader(s) must deal with local Internet domain regulating agency.
  • Local community must pay all fees and costs for the domain registration.
  • Local community must remember to renew the domain regularly.

 

To use this option, contact us with your request, before you purchase any domain. We'l try to respond as quickly as possible, consider the request, and arrange for a trademark license agreement as appropriate:

 

  • If you are to be responsible for the hosts for the community site, ensure your jboss.org account is up to date. If someone else is to be responsible, make sure you have their name and complete contact information available.
  • Contact us with your request. Use the subject Community domain request. Indicate whether you or someone else is to be responsible for the hosts. Do not post any other personal information in the email but please indicate the following:
    • Names of the team that will maintain the site, and their current roles in the JBoss Community
    • Name of the person who will own the domain
    • Services that will be offered through the new domain
    • An IP address or URL where we can look at the content and presentation, and verify that the trademark guidelines are being consistently applied
  • We'll ask for any further information needed.
  • We'll consider the request and if granted issue a trademark license agreement to the domain owner.
    • One of the factors used in consideration will be "likelihood to confuse". For example, if someone presented a jbug-<two letter code>.org domain, it would be rejected unless the two letter code is the official ISO-3166 country code for the community in question.

 

Trademark guidelines

In all cases, community domains must adhere to Red Hat's Trademark Guidelines and Policies.

 

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Project Trademarks

 

The following project names along with their name design and logos, either separately or in combination, are hereineafter referred to as 'Project Trademarks' and are trademarks of Red Hat Inc. Except as provided in these guidelines, you may not use the Project Trademarks or any confusingly similar marks as trademarks for your product/project, or use the Project Trademarks in any other manner that might cause confusion in the marketplace, including but not limited to in advertising, on auction sites, or on software or hardware. Red Hat protects the Project Trademarks on behalf of the entire JBoss Community. Indeed, the law obligates trademark owners to police their marks and prevent the use of confusingly similar names by third parties. As the trademark owner, Red Hat strives to use the Project Trademarks under the same guidelines as the rest of the community.

 

  • CapeDwarf
  • GateIn
  • RichFaces
  • SwitchYard
  • Weld
  • Seam
  • Snowdrop
  • RESTEasy
  • TorqueBox
  • Errai
  • Drools
  • Hibernate
  • Infinispan
  • HornetQ
  • jBPM
  • RiftSaw
  • JGroups
  • Blacktie
  • PicketBox
  • PicketLink
  • IronJacamar
  • Tohu
  • Teiid
  • Mobicents
  • ModeShape
  • Overlord
  • Guvnor
  • StormGrind
  • CirrAS
  • BoxGrinder
  • SteamCannon
  • Arquillian
  • ShrinkWrap
  • Tattletale
  • Byteman
  • Scribble
  • Savara
  • Mass
  • PressGang
  • mod_cluster
  • XNIO
  • Wise
  • APIviz

Usage That Does Not Require Permission

 

Below are some guidelines for use of the Project Trademarks where, as long as you are in compliance with the guidelines, no permission is necessary. In all cases, use is permitted only provided that:

 

  • the use is only in connection with promoting the projects
  • the use is not disparaging to Red Hat, its products or the projects
  • the use does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by Red Hat or the project
  • Proper trademark symbols are used in connection with the Project Trademarks and the trademark attribution statement must appear as explained in Proper Trademark Use

 

Noncommercial and community web sites

 

In the past, community members have inquired whether it is permissible to show support for projects by:

 

  • placing the Project Trademarks on a personal web site or blog to support a project
  • making a page on a social networking web site to support a project
  • linking to a project from a wiki to provide information or show support for a project

 

The guidelines relating to such usage are set forth in this section.

 

It is permissible to use the Project Trademarks on websites to show your support for a project, provided that:

 

  • where possible, the design logo hyperlinks to the project website, e.g. http://jboss.org/infinispan, or if that is not possible, the site includes a prominent link to the project website.
  • the site indicates clearly that it is not affiliated with or endorsed by the project; in addition, where possible:
    • the site must include the text "This site is not affiliated with or endorsed by <project/s>" prominently on any page that includes the Project Trademarks, and
    • if the Project Trademarks appear in a page header or any area that is designed to be presented on more than one page, the notice must also be designed to be presented on all of those pages as well. (i.e. if the Project Trademarks appear in a site-wide header, the informational text must appear in that header or an identically site-wide footer.)
  • the site does not use visual styling that could be confusing to viewers or visitors as to whether the site is hosted by or on behalf of a project

 

Business web sites

 

In the past, community members have inquired whether it is permissible to show support for a project by:

 

  • offering Project Merchandise for sale at a retail business or web site
  • displaying a link to a project using the Project Trademarks from a business web site
  • displaying the Project Trademarks as part of a business that provides services for clients using a project

 

The guidelines relating to such usage are set forth in this section.

 

It is permissible to use the Project Trademarks on business web sites, provided that:

 

  • the web site has non-project primary branding
  • the design logo hyperlinks to the project website, e.g. http://jboss.org/infinispan
  • the use does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by Red Hat or the project
  • the use of the Project Trademarks does not imply an association with or endorsement of any non-project goods or services
  • the site does not use visual styling that could be confusing to viewers or visitors as to whether the site is hosted by or on behalf of the project

 

Provided these guidelines are observed, it is permissible to use the Project Trademarks to sell Project Merchandise, and to advertise services for project-based systems (installation, configuration, troubleshooting, etc.)

 

Promotional events

 

In the past, community members have inquired whether it is permissible to use the Project Trademarks to promote open source software events such as JavaOne or community open source software trade shows. The guidelines relating to such usage are set forth in this section.

 

It is permissible to use the Project Trademarks without prior permission to promote open source software events where individuals in the project appear as Project Ambassadors or otherwise represent the project, provided the general guidelines above are followed. If you would like to make some non-software goods to give away at the event and don't already have a license to do so, see the 'Non-software goods' section below.

 

Publications

 

It is permissible to use the Project Trademarks in the title and content of a publication, provided that:

 

  • the use is clearly in reference to the project or its software
  • the use does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by Red Hat or the project
  • Proper trademark symbols are used in connection with the Project Trademarks and the trademark attribution statement must appear as explained in 'Proper Trademark Use' below.

 

Application themes, skins, and personas

 

In the past, community members have inquired whether it is permissible to show support for a project by placing the Project Trademarks in a theme, persona, or skin intended to alter the appearance of an application. The guidelines relating to such usage are set forth in this section. These guidelines do not apply to the appearance of a web site, which is covered elsewhere in this document.

 

It is permissible to use the Project Trademarks in themes, personas, or skins for applications to show your support for a project, provided that:

 

  • the use of the Project Trademarks does not conflict with the license or terms of use of the application being altered;
  • the use is non-commercial in nature; and,
  • the use does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by Red Hat or the project.

 

If you wish to use any existing project designs other than the Project Trademarks for your work, please observe the licensing requirements for those materials. If you have questions about these requirements for any particular design, contact the JBoss Community Design Team.

 

Usage That Requires Permission

 

Community members must obtain permission prior to using any of the Project Trademarks in the following situations.

 

Domain names


To establish a domain with a project name in its domain name, you must have a trademark license agreement with Red Hat.

 

Non-software goods

 

In the past, community members have inquired whether it is permissible to use Project Trademarks on non-software goods such as T-shirts, stickers, and pens.

 

Community members may request from Red Hat a license to use the Project Trademarks on non-software related goods, services, or other entities. Red Hat, or someone it delegates for the task, will ask to see the proposed designs before approving their use.

 

Unapproved Use

 

The following uses of the Project Trademarks are not approved under any foreseeable circumstances.

 

  • Violations of the 'Trademark Usage Guidelines' below.
  • Any use outside these guidelines not by explicit written permission

 

Except as set forth herein, the trademark owner (Red Hat) retains and reserves all rights to the Project Trademarks and their use, including the right to modify these guidelines.

 

Proper Trademark Use

 

One of the purposes of the JBoss Community is to make cutting-edge versions of Java Middleware widely available in a consistent format that the public can come to trust. To achieve this purpose it is important that the technology can quickly be identified and that the recipient knows the technology they are receiving is the official and unmodified version. Red Hat has chosen a number of project names to identify this effort and is granting usage rights in the Project Trademarks as previously described in this document in order to assure widespread availability.

 

Trademark Usage Guidelines

 

GuidelineExamples
When using the Project Trademarks you must provide the proper trademark symbols and a trademark attribution statement.

 

Acceptable:  Use Infinispan® for the first instance of the trademark, and include the statement "Infinispan and the Infinispan logo are trademarks of Red Hat, Inc."

 

Unacceptable:  Never using the ® mark for Infinispan, nor a trademark statement per the guidelines.

Always distinguish trademarks from surrounding text with at least initial capital letters or in all capital letters.

Acceptable:  Hibernate, HIBERNATE

 

Unacceptable:  hibernate, yourHibernate

Always use proper trademark form and spelling.

Acceptable:  jBPM

 

Unacceptable:  jBpm, JBPM, Jbpm

Never pluralize a trademark. Never use "a" or "the" to refer to an instance of the trademark. Always use a trademark as an adjective modifying a noun, or as a singular noun.

Acceptable:  This is a RichFaces interface.

Anyone can install RichFaces.

 

Unacceptable:  The RichFaces is great. I have seventeen RichFaces running in my application.

Never use a trademark as a verb. Trademarks are products or services, never actions.

Acceptable:  Install Drools on your computer.

 

Unacceptable:  Drool over your application logic today!

Never use a trademark as a possessive. Instead, the following noun should be used in possessive form or the sentence reworded so there is no possessive.

Acceptable:  The web interface using GateIn is very clean.

 

Unacceptable:  GateIn's web interface is very clean.

Never translate a trademark into another language.

Acceptable:  Quiero instalar Blacktie en mi sistema.

 

Unacceptable:  Quiero instalar empate negro en mi sistema.

Never use trademarks to coin new words or names.

Acceptable:  N/A


Unacceptable:  Teiid Fashion for geeks; Teiidorate.

Never alter a trademark in any way including through unapproved fonts or visual identifiers.

Acceptable:  Proper use of the JGroups logo.

 

Unacceptable:  Putting a target on top of the trademark.

Never use or register any trademarks that are confusingly similar to, or a play on, the project name.

Acceptable:  N/A


Unacceptable:  RESTeezy

Never combine your company name with a project name or use the project name in a way that it could be perceived that Red Hat or the project and your company have an organizational link such as a joint venture.

Acceptable:  AcmeCo uses Mobicents software on all its servers.

 

Unacceptable:  Bix Max servers are a partnership of Mobicents and AcmeCo.

Never use the Project Trademarks in a disparaging manner or in a manner that infringes Red Hat trademark rights or violates any federal, state, or international law.

Acceptable:  N/A


Unacceptable:  Little cartoon boy micturating on RiftSaw logo, applying RiftSaw logo outside permitted uses.

Never use terminology that states or implies that a project assumes any responsibility for the performance of your products and services.

Acceptable:  AcmeCo uses Mobicents software on all its servers.

 

Unacceptable:  Mobicents runs AcmeCo's servers.

Never abbreviate or use any Project Trademarks as an acronym.

Acceptable:  HornetQ.

 

Unacceptable:  HornQ, HORNETQ (Hide Or Reveal Network Queues)

Project logos must be hyperlinked to the project's homepage (e.g. http://jboss.org/drools) in contexts where such a hyperlink is technically feasible.

Acceptable:  Hyperlinking the logo where feasible.

 

Unacceptable:  Not hyperlinking the logo where feasible.


Other Information

Red Hat, Inc. ("Red Hat") does not permit use of its registered trademarks without permission. If you are aware of any such use, please contact us at tmlicense@redhat.com.